News

Wanguem, covidiots don’t eat frankenfood: what other new words have taken root lately

The Finnish word kalsarikannit means

The Finnish word kalsarikannit means “kalsarikkänit” the process of drinking alcoholic beverages at home, in your underwear, without wanting to go anywhere

A photo: Shutterstock

PANDEMIC GLOSSARY

Everyone knows that language changes with the course of history. And various events have always served as an impetus for the emergence of new words in any language, some of which are entered into dictionaries by philologists, and some remain in the spoken language, having not received such an honor.

Of course, the COVID-19 pandemic has become the brightest and largest milestone in the recent history of all mankind, enriching the vocabulary of people living in various countries with funny and not very words.

Take, for example, covidiot (covidiot): this word sounds the same in Russian, English, and German, and means a person who either panics excessively because of COVID-19 (for example, buys toilet paper in incredible quantities), or on the contrary, he defiantly neglects all sanitary requirements and does not want to put on a mask for anything.

Not everything is so simple with “vaccinoids”. The word appeared in both English and Russian, but it can have both positive and negative connotations. There are vaccinoids, among the first to be vaccinated with a new dose of protection against coronavirus, and there are those who, like “anti-vaxers” (another new word), are categorically against any vaccines.

SOBER SMOKERS

Opponents of the use of nicotine made the smober movement popular in different countries of the world. Sober – in English “sober, sane”, smoker – “smoker”. Smobers, on the other hand, are those who have already quit smoking, or are trying to do so.

Another activist – opponents of eating genetically modified products – introduced the word “frankenfood” (frankenfood), i.е. literally a food monster, by analogy with the monster that the scientist Victor Frankenstein created in Mary Shelley’s book.

The power of art in general has a noticeable influence on the appearance of neologisms. And the extent of this power is sometimes extremely difficult to determine. On the screens of Russian TV, two series were shown almost simultaneously – about the Bulgarian prophetess Vanga and the domestic predictor Wolf Messing. Either one series was longer, or the cast in the film about Vanga was stronger, but almost immediately after the end of the show, philologists recorded the appearance and active use of the verb “wang”, that is, guess, predict. For some reason, a similar neologism using the surname Messing did not appear … But horosceptics appeared in English almost at the same time, i.e. people who do not believe in horoscopes and predictions.

NAMED AFTER MEGAN MARKLE

Film characters, perhaps, have become the main champions in the formation of funny neologisms in various countries of the world. Last year in the US, the funniest such word was bridezilla (from bride – the bride and Godzilla). This word is called a capricious bride, who, preparing for the wedding, terrorizes relatives and organizers of the celebration with her nit-picking.

The roles played in the movie by Meghan Markle, the wife of the disgraced British Prince Harry, no one remembers. The Duchess of Sussex, who longed for world fame, nevertheless achieved it, and in a completely unexpected way – in Canada, Britain and the USA, even respected journalists use the very unexpected verb to Meghan Markle with might and main, which can be translated into Russian as “meganmarkle”, i.e. remove from your environment people with whom communication does not bring any benefit.

No one remembers the roles played in the movie by Meghan Markle, the wife of the disgraced British Prince Harry, but the Duchess of Sussex, who longed for world fame, nevertheless achieved it.

No one remembers the roles played in the movie by Meghan Markle, the wife of the disgraced British Prince Harry, but the Duchess of Sussex, who longed for world fame, nevertheless achieved it.

A photo: REUTERS

The champion in the invention of new words, without any doubt, is the official language of the State of Israel – Hebrew. Before the independence of this country in 1948, people only prayed in this ancient language. And now, for almost three quarters of a century, a specially created Academy has been monthly publishing a bulletin with new words, which should either fill in the gaps in the dictionary replenishment for thousands of years, or replace foreign borrowings, albeit equally understandable in most languages ​​of the world. So the Israelis say that “sputnik” and “pogrom” migrated from Russian to Hebrew without any translation and took root. And also another word that is used almost everywhere in Israel. “Kibenimat” is a curse and at the same time the direction in which the interlocutor should go. It can be used without any problems during TV interviews or parliamentary debates, and in different parts of Israel there are pubs and restaurants with this name.

GERMAN METAPHORS AND FINNISH PHILOSOPHY

Tourists going abroad most often catch in their ears funny words and expressions that sound funny in their native language. Take, for example, Czech: a stately guy with an oar on a boat in this country will be “a bastard with a cattle on a float”.

Having studied a foreign language well, one can understand the depth of meaning that this or that, sometimes quite ordinary, word carries. Any of the Internet translators will translate from German Drachenfutter as “food for the dragon”, and the Germans know that this is a gift that a husband who is guilty of something buys his wife in order to appease her. Or Mietmaul – literally translated as “mouth for rent”, but in fact, this is a lawyer or lawyer. The translation from the German Kummerspeck will be the obscure “fat of sadness.” But that’s what the Germans call the fight against stress by eating food. Wrinkle smoothers – Faltenbugler – they have long and firmly dubbed plastic surgeons. The time of the ball – Kugelzeit – will generally make you think: but in Germany (apparently, politically correct) they prefer to determine the period of pregnancy in this way.

Linguists call Finnish one of the most difficult languages ​​to learn. Finnish slowness and brevity, which have become the object of numerous jokes, have not touched the vocabulary of the Finns at all: their language is one of the few in the world in which one short word can mean a whole story, a range of feelings or a complex set of actions. Take, for example, kalsarikannit. A Russian person can use it to write a whole novel, trying to translate it all from Finnish. A means “kalsarikkyanit” the process of drinking alcoholic beverages at home, in your underwear, without the desire to go anywhere. The feeling that the two words torilla tavataan convey in Finnish is also well known to Russians, even if there is no short definition of it in Russian. This feeling of such a great event that it is simply necessary to share it with someone.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button