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Only those who hate Russia can drink: in Georgia, bar visitors are asked to fill out Russophobic questionnaires

The owners of Deadena Bar in Tbilisi decided to survey the Russians in order to decide, based on the results of the answers, whether to allow Russian citizens to enter the institution or refuse it.

The owners of Deadena Bar in Tbilisi decided to survey the Russians in order to decide, based on the results of the answers, whether to allow Russian citizens to enter the institution or refuse it.

A photo: SOCIAL NETWORK

While the Baltic States are discussing the possibility of refusing a visa to Russian citizens or, at worst, issuing a document allowing entry into the territory after answering questions from a special questionnaire, this idea has already been implemented in Georgia. No, not at the state level. The owners of Deadena Bar in Tbilisi decided to survey the Russians in order to decide, based on the results of the answers, whether to allow Russian citizens to enter the institution or refuse it.

All items in the questionnaire are purely political.

“I did not vote for Putin, he is a dictator.”

“I condemn Russian aggression in Ukraine.”

“Crimea is Ukraine, like other disputed territories.”

“Abkhazia and the Tskhinvali regions are Georgia.”

“20% of the territory of Georgia is occupied by Russia”.

And so on, up to the Ukrainian chants about the route of the “Russian warship” and “Glory to Ukraine.”

Moreover, visitors who are allowed to “board” after the questionnaire are immediately dictated by the rules of the “code of conduct”: do not communicate with staff in Russian, do not offer rubles as payment, do not enter into political discussions while drunk. It is not necessary to specifically explain that these rules apply only to Russians. As the administration of the institution explains, the questionnaire and the code were developed specifically as a counter to “bad Russians” in the “delicate political situation.”

A bar in Tbilisi introduced an offensive Russophobic questionnaire for visitors

A bar in Tbilisi introduced an offensive Russophobic questionnaire for visitors

And this is not today’s innovation. And a month ago, and two months ago, Russian visitors to this institution noted on the page of the bar that outright Russophobia flourishes here, Russians are not allowed here, and so on.

At the same time, it can be noted that in Georgia, and in European countries, in truly high-class institutions of this kind, among the staff there are necessarily several people who speak Russian. They are hired specifically to serve customers from Russia. I remember how, for example, in a prestigious restaurant in China, waiters were specially hired from the Central Asian republics precisely because of the knowledge of the Russian language. This, of course, was that Russian among the young Kirghiz and Tajiks, which is impossible to listen to without laughter, but it was possible to understand them, although with difficulty.

More obvious Russophobia, as they say, even in the afternoon with fire to look. But here, it seems, not only the obvious political background. It is typical that the visitor is required to identify himself in some other way, for example, through an account on social networks or via e-mail. And this is interesting, why? For further contacts and subsequent undercover work with representatives of a previously identified loyal contingent among Russian citizens? Very interesting questions already arise about the questionnaire itself, including where this data goes next.

And here’s another interesting thing – how much time would have passed from the moment, as if something similar happened in one of the Moscow bars or in an institution in another Russian city, and up to the ninth wave in social networks and the Western press about unheard-of racism and the triumph of fascism in Russia?

But here, you know, it’s different.

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